First large-scale census of coral heat tolerance published

In a first-of-its-kind study, Florida's  critically endangered staghorn corals were surveyed to discover which ones can better withstand future heatwaves in the ocean. Insights from the study, led by scientists at Shedd ...

Study: Fish camouflage better without friends nearby

It's like a half-hearted dress up party: gobies don't camouflage completely when in groups, new research finds. Gobies change color to avoid detection by predators and do so faster and better when alone.

In Egypt's Red Sea, corals fade as oceans warm

Standing on a boat bobbing gently in the Red Sea, Egyptian diving instructor Mohamed Abdelaziz looks on as tourists snorkel amid the brilliantly coloured corals, a natural wonder now under threat from climate change.

Global warming kills 14 percent of world's corals in a decade

Dynamite fishing and pollution—but mostly global warming—wiped out 14 percent of the world's coral reefs from 2009 to 2018, leaving graveyards of bleached skeletons where vibrant ecosystems once thrived, according to ...

Decadal climate variability in the tropical Pacific

From devastating floods to raging wildfires, climate variability on a global scale is apparent. These extreme weather events, and the world's climate system as a whole, are heavily influenced by the Tropical Pacific, an expanse ...

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Coral reef

Coral reefs are aragonite structures produced by living organisms, found in marine waters containing few nutrients. In most reefs, the predominant organisms are stony corals, colonial cnidarians that secrete an exoskeleton of calcium carbonate. The accumulation of skeletal material, broken and piled up by wave action and bioeroders, produces a calcareous formation that supports the living corals and a great variety of other animal and plant life.

Coral reefs most commonly live in tropical waters, but deep water and cold water corals exist on a much smaller scale.

Globally, coral reefs are under threat from climate change, ocean acidification, overuse of reef resources, and harmful land-use practices. High nutrient levels such as those found in runoff from agricultural areas can harm reefs by encouraging excess algae growth.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA