Scientists try to bolster Great Barrier Reef in warmer world

Below the turquoise waters off the coast of Australia is one of the world's natural wonders, an underwater rainbow jungle teeming with life that scientists say is showing some of the clearest signs yet of climate change.

Extinct but newly discovered: Germany's oldest freshwater shrimp

An international team of researchers led by the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin has described Germany's first fossil freshwater shrimp species in the journal Scientific Reports. Most shrimps love marine habitats, but this 48-million-year-old ...

Climate Questions: Is it too late to stop climate change?

Global average temperatures have risen and weather extremes have already seen an uptick, so the short answer to whether it's too late to stop climate change is: yes. But there's still time to prevent cascading effects, as ...

Study reveals how ancient fish colonized the deep sea

The deep sea contains more than 90% of the water in our oceans, but only about a third of all fish species. Scientists have long thought the explanation for this was intuitive—shallow ocean waters are warm and full of resources, ...

Coral reefs can adapt in response to mild marine heatwaves

A team of scientists from James Cook University (JCU) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have found that some coral species can adapt to increasing temperatures that cause bleaching, but only when marine ...

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Coral reef

Coral reefs are aragonite structures produced by living organisms, found in marine waters containing few nutrients. In most reefs, the predominant organisms are stony corals, colonial cnidarians that secrete an exoskeleton of calcium carbonate. The accumulation of skeletal material, broken and piled up by wave action and bioeroders, produces a calcareous formation that supports the living corals and a great variety of other animal and plant life.

Coral reefs most commonly live in tropical waters, but deep water and cold water corals exist on a much smaller scale.

Globally, coral reefs are under threat from climate change, ocean acidification, overuse of reef resources, and harmful land-use practices. High nutrient levels such as those found in runoff from agricultural areas can harm reefs by encouraging excess algae growth.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA