Loss of ancient grazers triggered a global rise in fires

From 50,000 years to 6,000 years ago, many of the world's largest animals, including such iconic grassland grazers as the woolly mammoth, giant bison, and ancient horses, went extinct. The loss of these grazing species triggered ...

Active matter theory explains fire-ant group behavior

Ants are social insects and the Solenopsis invicta species—known as the fire ant—is no exception. The social interactions of this invasive insect, which comes from South America, are framed within the context of the theory ...

Wildfire smoke accelerates glacier melt, affects mountain runoff

As global temperatures rise, wildfires are becoming more common. A new study by University of Saskatchewan (USask) hydrology researchers found that exposure to wildfire smoke can cause glaciers to melt faster, affecting mountain ...

Each Antarctic tourist effectively melts 83 metric tons of snow

Every summer, as the sea ice surrounding Antarctica retreats, tens of thousands of tourists and scientists flock to the landmass by boat and plane. The remote continent is becoming increasingly accessible—during the 2019-20 ...

A human footprint on the Pantanal inferno

One of the world's largest freshwater wetlands—the Pantanal—spreads across a bowl-shaped plain where Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay meet. During the rainy season in most years, floodwater drains from several swollen South ...

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