Sandwich catalysts offer higher activity and durability

The sandwich is a food concocted by the 18th-centutry nobles to play card games uninterrupted. Meat or vegetables were layered then tucked between bread to be eaten quickly while engaged in the game. This efficient food also ...

Green hydrogen: Research to enhance efficiency

Laboratory experiments and a parabolic flight campaign have enabled an international team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) to gain new insights into water electrolysis, in which hydrogen ...

Developing new ways to advance copper production

MIT associate professor of metallurgy Antoine Allanore has received a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to run larger scale tests of a new way ...

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Electrolysis

In chemistry and manufacturing, electrolysis (pronounced /iˌlɛkˈtrɒlɨsɪs/, from the Greek ἤλεκτρον [ɛ̌ːlektron] "amber" and λύσις [lýsis] "dissolution") is a method of using a direct electric current (DC) to drive an otherwise non-spontaneous chemical reaction. Electrolysis is commercially highly important as a stage in the separation of elements from naturally occurring sources such as ores using an electrolytic cell.

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