Developing new ways to advance copper production

MIT associate professor of metallurgy Antoine Allanore has received a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to run larger scale tests of a new way ...

Chemists produce and test novel solid oxide electrolysis cell

Researchers of the Institute of Chemical Engineering of Ural Federal University and the Institute of High-temperature Electrochemistry (Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed new electrochemical cells ...

S, N co-doped carbon nanotube-encapsulated CoS2@Co

Electrochemical water splitting is favorable strategy to produce high-purity H2. The current mainstream catalysts for water electrolysis are precious metals (Pt, RuO2, IrO2), which possess superior catalytic activity, relatively ...

Improved understanding of industrial electrode processes

In the industrial production of chlorine, special electrodes have been recently introduced, which consume much less current than conventional systems. The method requires oxygen to be introduced into a hot, highly concentrated ...

Transforming carbon dioxide

A team of researchers at the University of Delaware's Center for Catalytic Science and Technology (CCST) has discovered a novel two-step process to increase the efficiency of carbon dioxide (CO2) electrolysis, a chemical ...

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Electrolysis

In chemistry and manufacturing, electrolysis (pronounced /iˌlɛkˈtrɒlɨsɪs/, from the Greek ἤλεκτρον [ɛ̌ːlektron] "amber" and λύσις [lýsis] "dissolution") is a method of using a direct electric current (DC) to drive an otherwise non-spontaneous chemical reaction. Electrolysis is commercially highly important as a stage in the separation of elements from naturally occurring sources such as ores using an electrolytic cell.

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