Study reveals cost of nitrogen pollution

Nitrogen pollution costs Europe between 70 and 320 billion euros ($100bn-$460bn) per year in its impact on health and the environment, according to a major European study launched in Britain on Monday.

Urban farming yields small climate gains

Farming in and around cities is sustainable, but the gains in terms of climate are limited. To really make a difference we must change our eating habits. This conclusion was reached by Wageningen University researchers (The ...

Could learning self-control be enjoyable?

When it comes to self-control, consumers in the United States are in trouble. But a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research says there's hope; we just need a little help to see self-regulation as fun.

Sanyo launches first rice bread cooker

Japan's consumer electronics maker Sanyo has launched the world's first cooker that can turn rice grains into bread -- an innovation that it hopes will be a hit across Asia.

Study: Ads with plus-size models unlikely to work

(PhysOrg.com) -- Advertisements and catalogs featuring plus-size models are unlikely to work on their intended customers, according to a new study by an ASU researcher and her colleagues.

Only the beautiful need apply

Undergraduate women who join a sorority* are more likely to judge their own bodies from an outsider's perspective (known as self-objectification) and display higher levels of bulimic attitudes and behaviors than those who ...

Are holiday and weekend eating patterns affecting obesity rates?

The holidays can be challenging for even the most diligent dieters. But are weekends just as detrimental? Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., found that weekend eating patterns ...

Mice can eat 'junk' and not get fat

A study in the September 4th issue of the journal Cell identifies a gene that springs into action in response to a high fat diet. Mice that lack the gene become essentially immune to growing obese, regardless of their eating ...

Prehistoric bears also ate everything and anything

By comparing the craniodental morphology of modern bear species to that of two extinct species, researchers from the University of Málaga, Spain, have discovered that the expired plantigrades were not so different ...

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