Craving carbs? Blame your brain, Japan study finds

Under pressure and gobbling pizza or chocolate? It may not be your fault, according to Japanese researchers who have isolated the neurons that drive a craving for carbs.

New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia

A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings, published in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, are based on fossilised ...

Fasting for Lent forces hyenas to change diet

Many Christians give up certain foods for Lent, however ecologists have discovered these changes in human diet have a dramatic impact on the diet of wild animals. In Ethiopia, members of the Orthodox Tewahedo Church stop ...

Learned helplessness in flies and the roots of depression

When faced with impossible circumstances beyond their control, animals, including humans, often hunker down as they develop sleep or eating disorders, ulcers, and other physical manifestations of depression. Now, researchers ...

A taste for fat may have made us human, says study

Long before human ancestors began hunting large mammals for meat, a fatty diet provided them with the nutrition to develop bigger brains, posits a new paper in Current Anthropology.

Study discovers eating habits of Diplodocus

A team of researchers from the University of Bristol, Natural History Museum of London, the University of Missouri and Ohio University has discovered the eating habits of Diplodocus using a three-dimensional model of the ...

Gorillas, unlike humans, gorge protein yet stay slim

(PhysOrg.com) -- A Massey University scientist's study on how wild gorillas in Uganda stay healthy by gorging on protein has highlighted fundamental differences in the way eating habits of various species evolve.

Study: Ads with plus-size models unlikely to work

(PhysOrg.com) -- Advertisements and catalogs featuring plus-size models are unlikely to work on their intended customers, according to a new study by an ASU researcher and her colleagues.

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