Related topics: antibiotics · cancer cells · breast cancer · hiv · malaria

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread ...

Modified cancer drug effective against multi-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasingly the source of deadly infections. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Center for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig have ...

New insights to major disease pathways

Flinders researchers have made major inroads into finding the cause of heart disease, Alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes and other diseases after discovering a further 148 proteins affected by oxidative stress in the human body.

How to find molecular glues to effectively target diseases

Many of the currently available drugs are not specific enough to effectively cure complex diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. In addition, drug resistance reduces the effectiveness of existing ...

Using fungi to search for medical drugs

An enormous library of products derived from more than 10,000 fungi could help scientists find new drugs. Researchers from the group of Jeroen den Hertog at the Hubrecht Institute, in collaboration with researchers from the ...

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Drug resistance

Drug resistance is the reduction in effectiveness of a drug in curing a disease or improving a patient's symptoms. When the drug is not intended to kill or inhibit a pathogen, then the term is equivalent to dosage failure or drug tolerance. More commonly, the term is used in the context of diseases caused by pathogens.

Pathogens are said to be drug-resistant when drugs meant to neutralize them have reduced effect. When an organism is resistant to more than one drug, it is said to be multidrug resistant.

Drug resistance is an example of evolution in microorganisms. Individuals that are not susceptible to the drug effects are capable of surviving drug treatment, and therefore have greater fitness than susceptible individuals. By the process of natural selection, drug resistant traits are selected for in subsequent offspring, resulting in a population that is drug resistant.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA