Related topics: students

Lack of media skepticism tied to belief in rape myths

People who tend to recognize similarities between people they know and people depicted in the media are more likely to believe common myths about sexual assault, according to a new study co-led by a Cornell researcher.

Advanced degrees bring higher starting salaries—and more debt

People with a master's degree or doctorate can bank on a much higher starting salary than those with the same major but only a bachelor's degree. That's according to a recent survey of employers by the National Association ...

Some US colleges cancel, postpone graduation over virus

Colleges across the U.S. have begun canceling and curtailing graduation amid fears that the coronavirus pandemic will stretch into spring. Some are exploring "virtual" alternatives, while others are considering inviting seniors ...

College major choices can predict gender wage gaps

For the first time ever, college-educated women appear on track to outnumber college-educated men in the workforce, a milestone in what has been a decades-long trend. However, those women still trail their male peers in compensation.

Almost 10% of NC State students experienced homelessness

A representative survey of undergraduate and graduate students at North Carolina State University finds that almost 10% of students experienced homelessness in the previous year, and more than 14% of students dealt with food ...

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College

College (Latin: collegium) is a term most often used today to denote degree awarding tertiary educational institution. More broadly, it can be the name of any group of colleagues, for example, an electoral college, a College of Arms or the College of Cardinals. Originally, it meant a group of persons living together, under a common set of rules (con- = "together" + leg- = "law" or lego = "I choose"); indeed, some colleges call their members "fellows". The precise usage of the term varies among the English-speaking countries. In the United States, for example, the terms 'college' and 'university' may be regarded as loosely interchangeable, whereas in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia, a 'college' is usually an institution between school and university level (although constituent schools within universities are also known as 'colleges').

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