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The unpredictability of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on people's daily lives has facilitated changes ranging from social interactions to purchasing behavior. Adjusting to the many disruptions may seem difficult, but ...

Electoral college could undermine voter confidence, study finds

If a candidate wins the presidency in the electoral college but loses the popular vote in 2020—a repeat of what happened in 2000 and in 2016—the damage to Americans' faith in the election process would be substantial, ...

Neurotic college students could benefit from health education

College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on certain personality types, especially neurotic personalities, college health courses could help students develop a more ...

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College

College (Latin: collegium) is a term most often used today to denote degree awarding tertiary educational institution. More broadly, it can be the name of any group of colleagues, for example, an electoral college, a College of Arms or the College of Cardinals. Originally, it meant a group of persons living together, under a common set of rules (con- = "together" + leg- = "law" or lego = "I choose"); indeed, some colleges call their members "fellows". The precise usage of the term varies among the English-speaking countries. In the United States, for example, the terms 'college' and 'university' may be regarded as loosely interchangeable, whereas in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia, a 'college' is usually an institution between school and university level (although constituent schools within universities are also known as 'colleges').

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