How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo

Embryonic development is a process of profound physical transformation, one that has challenged researchers for centuries. How do genes and molecules control forces and tissue stiffness to orchestrate the emergence of form ...

Mathematical model can improve our knowledge on cancer

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a new mathematical tool to characterize what happens when cells lose their polarity (direction) in diseases such as cancer. The result is advancing ...

Genome doubling, cell size and novelty

In the 2019 Coulter Review, "Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell," published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. Doyle and Jeremy ...

Discovery casts doubt on cell surface organization models

Like planets, the body's cell surfaces look smooth from a distance, but contoured closer up. An article published in Communications Biology describes previously unknown implications of the way data from cell surfaces are ...

Bacteria help discover human cancer-causing proteins

A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas at Austin has applied an unconventional approach that used bacteria to discover human proteins that can lead to DNA damage and promote cancer. ...

Study pinpoints how Salmonella sneaks into plant roots

In recent years, contamination of salad vegetables by E. coli and salmonella bacteria—the most common causes of food poisoning—have led to large-scale recalls. Although most salmonella outbreaks are linked to contamination ...

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed

A group of researchers from the Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) has revealed the importance of eliminating any excess of defective products that might have accumulated in the mitochondria, ...

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