Related topics: orbit · satellite · nasa · international space station · space

Steam balloon to facilitate satellite launches

Steam balloons could be used to lift space rockets to higher altitude for launch. Launching from high altitude reduces air drag and thus improves efficiency. The researchers present the method in an article published in The ...

Altitude record for porcini mushrooms

ETH researchers have discovered Boletus edulis (porcini mushrooms) growing at an elevation of over 2,400 metres in the Lower Engadine—the highest altitude ever recorded for these popular edible mushrooms in the Alps. Moreover, ...

Connecting the dots: nitrogen dioxide over Siberian pipelines

New maps that use information from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite reveal emissions of nitrogen dioxide along a Siberian natural gas pipeline that connects the Urengoy gas field—the second-largest gas field in the ...

Pressure mounts on aviation industry over climate change

Under pressure from frequent flyers alarmed over climate change, the airline industry says it is "hellbent" on reducing emissions—but the technology needed to drastically reduce its carbon footprint is still out of reach.

Every bat travels differently

The females of some bat species migrate hundreds of kilometers after hibernation to give birth to their offspring in insect-rich regions. Unlike birds, it is largely unknown how bats keep their energy consumption low during ...

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Altitude

Altitude or height is defined based on the context in which it is used (aviation, geometry, geographical survey, sport, and more). As a general definition, altitude is a distance measurement, usually in the vertical or "up" direction, between a reference datum and a point or object. The reference datum also often varies according to the context. Although the term altitude is commonly used to mean the height above sea level of a location, in geography the term elevation is often preferred for this usage.

Vertical distance measurements in the "down" direction are commonly referred to as depth.

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