New evidence for the vibration theory of smell

(Phys.org)—The predictive power and galvanizing influence that theoretical models routinely enjoy in physics is only rarely replicated in biology. Lord Raleigh's theory of sound perception, Francis Crick's sequence and ...

Vinegar: A cheap and simple way to help plants fight drought

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a new, yet simple, way to increase drought tolerance in a wide range of plants. Published in Nature Plants, the study reports a newly ...

The secrets behind a creepy photographic technique

In the 1960s, a French artist named Jean-Pierre Sudre began experimenting with an obscure 19th-century photographic process, creating dramatic black-and-white photographs with ethereal veiling effects. Sudre christened the ...

The world's cleanest water droplet

In nature, there is no such thing as a truly clean surface. Contact with normal air is sufficient to coat any material with a thin layer of molecules. This "molecular dirt" can change the properties of the material considerably, ...

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Acetate

An acetate (pronounced /ˈæsɪteɪt/) is a derivative of acetic acid. This term includes salts and esters, as well as the anion found in solution. Most of the approximately 5 billion kilograms of acetic acid produced annually in industry are used in the production of acetates, which usually take the form of polymers. In nature, acetate is the most common building block for biosynthesis. For example, the fatty acids are produced by connecting C2 units derived from acetate.

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