Gold solution to catalysis grand challenge

A simple, low-cost method of directly converting natural gas into useful chemicals and fuels, using the precious metal gold as a key ingredient, has been proposed by researchers at Cardiff University in collaboration with ...

New discovery can improve industrial yeast strains

Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is used industrially to produce a great variety of biochemicals. These biochemicals can be produced from waste material from the agricultural or forest industry (second-generation ...

Microorganism that remediates cadmium-contaminated soil

In recent years, phytoremediation (the utilization of plants, animals and microorganism to take up or immobilize hazardous substances from contaminated soils) has been widely applied to the remediation of Cadmium (Cd) contaminated ...

Researchers translate insect defense chemicals into eerie sounds

Sawfly larvae protect themselves by secreting cocktails of unpleasant, volatile chemicals intended to repel predators, particularly ants. Researchers can assess the effectiveness of these defenses by staging meetups, so-called ...

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Acetate

An acetate (pronounced /ˈæsɪteɪt/) is a derivative of acetic acid. This term includes salts and esters, as well as the anion found in solution. Most of the approximately 5 billion kilograms of acetic acid produced annually in industry are used in the production of acetates, which usually take the form of polymers. In nature, acetate is the most common building block for biosynthesis. For example, the fatty acids are produced by connecting C2 units derived from acetate.

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