University of Groningen

The University of Groningen (Dutch: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen), located in the city of Groningen, was founded in 1614. It is one of the oldest universities in the Netherlands as well as one of its largest. Since its inception more than 200,000 students have graduated. It is a member of the distinguished Coimbra Group. In April 2013, according to the results of the International Student Barometer, the University of Groningen, for the third time in a row, has been voted the best University of the Netherlands. In 2014 the university celebrates its 400th anniversary with various activities in and around the city of Groningen.

Address
Groningen, Netherlands
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New GAIA data reveals mergers in Milky Way

University of Groningen astronomers have discovered relics of merger events in the Milky Way halo. Five small groups of stars appear to represent mergers with smaller galaxies, while a big 'blob' comprising hundreds of stars ...

dateJun 13, 2018 in Astronomy
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Quantum effects observed in photosynthesis

Molecules that are involved in photosynthesis exhibit the same quantum effects as non-living matter, concludes an international team of scientists including University of Groningen theoretical physicist Thomas la Cour Jansen. ...

dateMay 21, 2018 in Quantum Physics
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Computer redesigns enzyme

University of Groningen biotechnologists used a computational method to redesign aspartase and convert it to a catalyst for asymmetric hydroamination reactions. Their colleagues in China scaled up the production of this enzyme ...

dateMay 21, 2018 in Biochemistry
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Creating a 2-D platinum magnet

University of Groningen physicists have induced magnetism in platinum with an electric field created by a paramagnetic ionic liquid. As only the surface of the platinum is affected, this creates a switchable 2-D ferromagnet. ...

dateApr 06, 2018 in General Physics
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Practical spin wave transistor one step closer

University of Groningen physicists have managed to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet, using only an electrical current. This is a huge step towards the spin transistor that is needed to construct spintronic devices. ...

dateMar 01, 2018 in General Physics
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