Umeå University (Swedish: Umeå universitet) is a university in Umeå in the mid-northern region of Sweden. The university was founded in 1965 and is the fifth oldest within Sweden's present borders. During the seventies the university became known as the "red university" due to a large number of student strikes and a large share of left-wing politically active students. Since then conditions have normalised and Umeå University now has over 15,500 full-time students, including master students. It has more than 4,000 employees, including 332 full professors. Internationally, the university is known for research relating to the genome of the Populus tree (Life sciences), contributions to the Gleason problem and function spaces on fractals (mathematics) and its school of industrial design which gives degree programs in English open to students from all of the world. It is also the one of largest providers of distance education courses in the Nordic countries.

Address
Umeå, Västerbotten County
Website
http://www.umu.se/english
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ume%C3%A5_University

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Motor enzyme protects genome through several mechanisms

A helicase, Pfh1, can thanks to several different mechanisms protect the genome from DNA obstacles and damages associated with cancer. This is shown in a new doctoral thesis at Umeå University, Sweden.

How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease

Scientists from Umeå university have shown that the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic ...

Parents' guts tell tales to their children

Researchers at Umeå university in Sweden have published a new study showing that the gut bacteria can carry information of past experiences of an altered environment from parents to offspring. Eggs and sperm are not the ...

All genes of the Aspen tree mapped

This week, a team of researchers from Sweden, Belgium, England, Italy, Norway and South Korea publish the genomes of two species of aspen trees, a project that has taken close to ten years to complete and that proved to be ...

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