Umeå University (Swedish: Umeå universitet) is a university in Umeå in the mid-northern region of Sweden. The university was founded in 1965 and is the fifth oldest within Sweden's present borders. During the seventies the university became known as the "red university" due to a large number of student strikes and a large share of left-wing politically active students. Since then conditions have normalised and Umeå University now has over 15,500 full-time students, including master students. It has more than 4,000 employees, including 332 full professors. Internationally, the university is known for research relating to the genome of the Populus tree (Life sciences), contributions to the Gleason problem and function spaces on fractals (mathematics) and its school of industrial design which gives degree programs in English open to students from all of the world. It is also the one of largest providers of distance education courses in the Nordic countries.

Address
Umeå, Västerbotten County
Website
http://www.umu.se/english
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ume%C3%A5_University

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New discovery of a mechanism that controls cell division

Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, have discovered that how a special protein complex called the Mediator moves along genes in DNA may have an impact on how cells divide. The discovery may be important for future research ...

Life's insiders: Decoding endosymbiosis with mathematics

Endosymbiosis, the intimate and long-term relationship where one organism lives inside another, is a cornerstone of life as we know it, and a key to the emergence of complex life on Earth. Many of the mysteries surrounding ...

Nordic microalgae: Potential superstars in the green transition

The carbon dioxide emissions of the growing human population have a massive impact on the climate. While many are seeking solutions, researchers in Umeå, Sweden, might have found one right in front of their houses: Nordic ...

Clues from the ice age can help restore Swedish streams

Human intervention has destroyed critical habitats for salmon and trout in Swedish streams. Researchers at Umeå University have discovered crucial clues to help restore the streams to their natural state.

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