What makes the Earth's surface move?

Do tectonic plates move because of motion in the Earth's mantle, or is the mantle driven by the movement of the plates? Or could it be that this question is ill-posed? This is the point of view adopted by scientists at the ...

Ants: Jam-free traffic champions

Whether they occur on holiday routes or the daily commute, traffic jams affect cars as well as pedestrians. Scientists at the Research Center on Animal Cognition (CNRS/Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier) and the University ...

A stretchable and flexible biofuel cell that runs on sweat

A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université ...

West Africa: Human-induced air pollution is higher than expected

Emissions of volatile organic pollutants in West Africa are 100 to 150 times higher than current estimates for the region, according to a study by researchers from the CNRS and Université Clermont-Auvergne, in collaboration ...

Northern France was already inhabited more than 650,000 years ago

The first evidence of human occupation in northern France has been put back by 150,000 years, thanks to the findings of a team of scientists from the CNRS and the Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle at the emblematic site ...

Peatlands trap carbon dioxide, even during droughts

Although peatlands make up only 3 percent of the Earth's surface, they store one third of the soil carbon trapped in soils globally. Preserving peatlands is therefore of paramount importance for mitigating climate change, ...

What the cranium of oldest human ancestor would have looked like

Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of Homo sapiens had a surprisingly modern skull, as suggested by a model created by CNRS researcher Aurélien Mounier of the Histoire Naturelle ...

Faster and slower languages convey information at similar rates

Are some languages spoken faster than others? Are some structurally more complex? And, finally, are some better at transmitting information? These age‐old questions might have received a surprising answer in a new article ...

page 2 from 39