Are the French lousy at languages? Not if there's noise!

It is often said that the French have poor English skills. But according to a study conducted by a CNRS researcher (along with colleagues in the Netherlands, Finland and UK), when it comes to processing English spoken in ...

What happens to magnetic nanoparticles in cells?

Although magnetic nanoparticles are being used more and more in cell imaging and tissue bioengineering, what happens to them within stem cells in the long term remained undocumented. Researchers from CNRS, the Sorbonne Université, ...

Discovery of the oldest evidence of motility on Earth

An international multi-disciplinary team coordinated by Abderrazak El Albani at the Institut de chimie des milieux et matériaux de Poitiers (CNRS/Université de Poitiers) has uncovered the oldest fossilised traces of motility. ...

These strange fossils are closely related to sea urchins

Just a few centimeters long, these animals thrived in the ocean roughly half a billion years ago. Because of their odd morphology, scientists have long struggled to find their branch on the tree of life.

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds

Precise simulations of the movement and behavior of crowds can be vital to the production of digital sequences or the creation of large structures for crowd management. However, the ability to quantitatively predict the collective ...

Pollution: New ammonia emission sources detected from space

Researchers from the CNRS and the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) have prepared the first global map of the distribution of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) by analyzing measurements taken by satellites between 2008 and 2016. ...

Fruit flies can transmit their sexual preferences culturally

Researchers from the CNRS and Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier (UT3) report that fruit flies possess the cognitive capacity to culturally transmit their sexual preferences across generations. The study, published ...

The origins of asymmetry: A protein that makes you do the twist

Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... A team from the Institute of biology ...

'Cellular dust' provides new hope for regenerative medicine

While stem cells have the most therapeutic potential, the benefits of regenerative medicine may best be mobilised using extracellular vesicles (EVs), also known in the past as "cellular dust." A team of researchers from CNRS, ...

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