The Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University is a leader in education and research in advanced manufacturing, bioengineering, computational engineering, energy and the environment, micro/nanoengineering, product design, and robotics. We empower students through hands-on learning, flexibility of course work, and multidisciplinary collaboration to solve real-world problems.

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A path to the future, paved with ceramics

When you hear the word "ceramics," you may think of the mug you made in pottery class or the vases collecting dust on your grandmother's shelf. While these objects are made up of ceramics, they're only one small part of the ...

Eating out, breathing in

By now, most Americans are well aware of the air pollution created by power plants or heavy vehicle traffic. These sources discharge harmful particulate matter that becomes suspended in the air, creating what's called an ...

Supersolder exhibits unparalleled thermal properties

In electronics, solder is used to connect two parts together. As a bridge, one of its most important functions is to transfer heat away from critical electronic components and toward the heat sink, which uses air or water ...

Self-healing material a breakthrough for bio-inspired robotics

Many natural organisms have the ability to repair themselves. Now, manufactured machines will be able to mimic this property. In findings published this week in Nature Materials, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University ...

Invisible, stretchable circuits to shape next-gen tech

Electrically conductive films that are optically transparent have a central role in a wide range of electronics applications, from touch screens and video displays to photovoltaics. These conductors function as invisible ...

A 3-D approach to stop cancer in its tracks

Every day, roughly 100 billion new cells are created inside the human body. These cells join trillions of older cells to form the tissues and organs we rely on to stay alive. Sometimes when a cell is created, a mutation occurs ...

3-D printing remakes the strain gauge

Rahul Panat and a team of researchers from CMU, WSU, and UT-El Paso have developed a new 3-D printing technique for manufacturing strain gauges that breaks the Poisson Ratio by 40%.

Fluidic transistor ushers the age of liquid computers

Transistors, those tiny electrical switches that process signals and data, are the brain power behind every electronic device – from laptops and smartphones to your digital thermostat. As they continue to shrink in size, ...

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