The Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University is a leader in education and research in advanced manufacturing, bioengineering, computational engineering, energy and the environment, micro/nanoengineering, product design, and robotics. We empower students through hands-on learning, flexibility of course work, and multidisciplinary collaboration to solve real-world problems.

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Fluidic transistor ushers the age of liquid computers

Transistors, those tiny electrical switches that process signals and data, are the brain power behind every electronic device – from laptops and smartphones to your digital thermostat. As they continue to shrink in size, ...

Researchers discover melanin could make for great batteries

Melanin is best known as the pigment that dictates our skin tones, but it is found just about everywhere—in our brains, in our hair. It is even found in cuttlefish. But as abundant as melanin is, its exact macromolecular ...

Researchers develop landmark achievement in walking technology

Researchers at the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a novel design approach for exoskeletons and prosthetic limbs that incorporates direct feedback from the human body. The findings were ...

Taking a close look at metal 3-D printing

In the wee hours of a Saturday morning, Carnegie Mellon University Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Tony Rollett and graduate students Ross Cunningham and Tugce Ozturk sit together in Sector 2 of the mile-wide ...

A 3-D approach to stop cancer in its tracks

Every day, roughly 100 billion new cells are created inside the human body. These cells join trillions of older cells to form the tissues and organs we rely on to stay alive. Sometimes when a cell is created, a mutation occurs ...

Researchers find new vehicle emissions to be deceptively clean

For years, automakers have been working to reduce pollutant levels coming out of motor vehicles' tailpipes. Airborne particulate matter, for example, is present in automobile exhaust and has been shown to contribute to tens ...

Self-healing material a breakthrough for bio-inspired robotics

Many natural organisms have the ability to repair themselves. Now, manufactured machines will be able to mimic this property. In findings published this week in Nature Materials, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University ...

Invisible, stretchable circuits to shape next-gen tech

Electrically conductive films that are optically transparent have a central role in a wide range of electronics applications, from touch screens and video displays to photovoltaics. These conductors function as invisible ...

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