Rescued tigers get Spanish safe haven

Gogh, a male tiger, is seen in his temporary enclosure at the zoo in Poznan, Poland, on November 6
Gogh, a male tiger, is seen in his temporary enclosure at the zoo in Poznan, Poland, on November 6

Five of nine tigers that narrowly survived a gruelling journey across Europe will be moved to a new home at an animal refuge in Spain after spending weeks recovering at zoos in Poland.

The tigers will leave on Sunday for the "Primadomus" Wildlife Refuge in the south-eastern Spanish town of Villena, Malgorzata Chodyla, spokeswoman for the zoo in Poznan, western Poland, said on Thursday.

Polish authorities found ten emaciated and dehydrated big cats in the back of a truck taking them from Italy to a zoo in Russia's Dagestan Republic.

Polish prosecutors charged two Italian truck drivers and a Russian man believed to have organised the journey with after the truck that set off from Italy on October 22 carrying the ten tigers got stuck for days on Poland's border with Belarus.

Prosecutors also charged a Polish border service veterinarian for failing to properly examine the tigers when they first arrived at the Koroszczyn crossing, where one of them died.

The surviving nine tigers have spent nearly a month recovering from their ordeal at two Polish zoos.

The Poznan zoo described them as "emaciated, dehydrated, with sunken eyes, excrement stuck to their fur, urine burns, in a total state of stress, without the will or desire to live" when they were first discovered.

  • Softi, a female tiger, was among ten emaciated and dehydrated big cats found in the back of a truck en route from Italy to Russi
    Softi, a female tiger, was among ten emaciated and dehydrated big cats found in the back of a truck en route from Italy to Russia's Dagestan Republic
  • Samson, a male tiger, narrowly survived a gruelling journey across Europe
    Samson, a male tiger, narrowly survived a gruelling journey across Europe
  • Kan, a male tiger, is seen in his temporary enclosure at the zoo in Poznan, Poland on November 6
    Kan, a male tiger, is seen in his temporary enclosure at the zoo in Poznan, Poland on November 6

According to animal rights organisations, only between 3,200 and 3,900 tigers live in the wild worldwide.

Another 7,000 are held in captivity, mainly in Asia.


Explore further

Four Bengal tigers born in El Salvador animal park

© 2019 AFP

Citation: Rescued tigers get Spanish safe haven (2019, November 29) retrieved 21 January 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2019-11-tigers-spanish-safe-haven.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
6 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments