Image: Mature galaxy mesmerizes in new Hubble view

Mature galaxy mesmerizes in new Hubble view
NGC 7773 is a beautiful example of a barred spiral galaxy. A luminous bar-shaped structure cuts prominently through the galaxy's bright core, extending to the inner boundary of NGC 7773's sweeping, pinwheel-like spiral arms. Astronomers think that these bar structures emerge later in the lifetime of a galaxy. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Walsh

This striking image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful instrument installed on the telescope in 2009. WFC3 is responsible for many of Hubble's most breathtaking and iconic photographs.

Shown here, NGC 7773 is a beautiful example of a barred . A luminous bar-shaped structure cuts prominently through the galaxy's bright core, extending to the inner boundary of NGC 7773's sweeping, pinwheel-like spiral arms. Astronomers think that these bar structures emerge later in the lifetime of a galaxy, as star-forming material makes its way towards the —younger spirals do not feature barred structures as often as older spirals do, suggesting that bars are a sign of galactic maturity. They are also thought to act as stellar nurseries, as they gleam brightly with copious numbers of youthful stars.

Our galaxy, the Milky Way, is thought to be a barred spiral like NGC 7773. By studying galactic specimens such as NGC 7773 throughout the universe, researchers hope to learn more about the processes that have shaped—and continue to shape—our cosmic home.


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Citation: Image: Mature galaxy mesmerizes in new Hubble view (2019, June 7) retrieved 18 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-image-mature-galaxy-mesmerizes-hubble.html
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Jun 07, 2019
I have been wondering if spiral galaxies are true to the momentum of the Coriolis Force/Coriolis Effect. The direction in which the arms are moving is similar to centrifugal force of which there are many examples in Nature.

Jun 07, 2019
There are some very complicated issues of galaxy formation. Unfortunately, here is the same problem as with the stars. The origin of galaxies remains unclear, in spite of huge activity in the field. What the "formation" means? It means that we have the material that is assembling into galaxies.
https://www.acade...ome_From
https://www.acade...rvations

Jun 08, 2019
"younger spirals do not feature barred structures as often as older spirals do"

This seems half backwards to me, the Whirlpool does not seem very distant, for example, so I'd think it might be on the old end.

By some notions involving a "stationary wave" low energy quantum gravity, a bar would start out as a growing instability until it falls into a wave-defined radius of proto-arm matter and then it should begin to shorten while pulling arm ends inward.


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