NASA unveils schedule for 'Artemis' 2024 Moon mission

NASA plans to return humans to the Moon by 2024, for the first time since the Apollo program ended in 1972
NASA plans to return humans to the Moon by 2024, for the first time since the Apollo program ended in 1972

NASA on Thursday unveiled the calendar for the "Artemis" program that will return astronauts to the Moon for the first time in half a century, including eight scheduled launches and a mini-station in lunar orbit by 2024.

The original lunar missions were named for Apollo—Artemis was his twin sister in Greek mythology, and the goddess of hunting, wilderness and the Moon.

Administrator Jim Bridenstine confirmed that Artemis 1 will be an uncrewed mission around the Moon planned for 2020.

Next will come Artemis 2, which will orbit Earth's satellite with a crew around 2022; followed finally by Artemis 3 that will put astronauts on lunar soil in 2024, including the first woman.

The three will be launched into space by the biggest rocket of all time, the Boeing-led Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently under development but has seen numerous delays and has been criticized in some quarters as a bloated jobs program.

Affixed to its summit will be the Orion capsule, for which Lockheed Martin is the primary contractor.

In addition to these missions, which will be all NASA's efforts, there will be five launches carrying the building blocks of the lunar mini-station "Gateway" which will serve as a staging point for the Moon landing.

These will be carried out between 2022 and 2024 by private space companies, which NASA will pay for their services.

The orbital station will initially consist of a simple power and propulsion element and a small habitat module. In 2024, astronauts will stop there en route to the Moon.

They will then descend to the surface on a lander.

A part of the lander will remain on the Moon while the other part will take off and allow the astronauts to return to their station, where they will board the Orion capsule and return to Earth.

Bridenstine said Thursday that NASA had chosen private firm Maxar to build the station's first module, the power and propulsion element, which would rely on huge solar panels.

In the coming months, NASA will have to decide on who will build the lander. Aerospace giants such as Boeing and Lockheed Martin are vying for the contract as are new players like Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin.

"We're not owning the hardware, we're buying the service," said Bridenstine of the lander. "The goal here is speed. 2024 is right around the corner."

He added: "Our goal is ultimately to move on to Mars and not get stuck on the surface of the Moon"


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NASA dubs 2024 Moon mission 'Artemis,' asks for $1.6 billion

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Citation: NASA unveils schedule for 'Artemis' 2024 Moon mission (2019, May 23) retrieved 21 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-nasa-unveils-artemis-moon-mission.html
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May 23, 2019
A major concern touched upon in the presentation is abrasive and corrosive lunar dust. An easy solution would be nuke detonations at a suitable altitude to vitrify a large area. I suppose the russians will handling R&D on that.

May 23, 2019
"In 1949, the Armour Research Foundation (ARF), based at the Illinois Institute of Technology, began studying the effects of nuclear explosions on the environment. These studies continued until 1962.[2] In May 1958, ARF began covertly researching the potential consequences of a nuclear explosion on the Moon."

"Later reports in the 2010s show that a corresponding Soviet project did indeed exist, although the only official documents on the project presently found began in 1958,[10] not the 1957 date of the "anonymous" source whose rumors initiated the US project, and the official Soviet plan similarly differs from the scenario reported in the press."

-Not my good idea.

May 23, 2019
The Apollo program cost $150 Billion in inflation adjusted dollars.

Where's the budget to do this by 2024? Even with the short timeframe, it should at least look more like $30 billion a year.

May 24, 2019
It will cost less than the Apollo era would've spent, i think. There's still more to be found but new techs will do the work better, faster and further than before.
Will it be enough to justify the costs? Errr.....well, that's what we'll figure out, either before or during the program really starts. It's still nice to see money not spent on war and stuff, since it'll never be spent on health and food.

May 24, 2019
The Apollo program cost $150 Billion in inflation adjusted dollars.

Where's the budget to do this by 2024? Even with the short timeframe, it should at least look more like $30 billion a year.
Hey why dont you do a little research rather than guessing and assuming? Apparently the money IS there because this IS what's going to happen.
t will cost less than the Apollo era would've spent, i think. There's still more to be found but new techs will do the work better, faster and further than before
Another guesser. If you want to shut the critic down, why dont you do a little work and find out? Hint: it's detailed in the NASA presentation.

What good are guesses and assumptions and opinions when the FACTS are readily available here on the internet??

May 24, 2019
I laugh at people's assumption that funding for space research somehow magically vanishes,
That the dollars are physically stuffed into the rockets.
To be burned off as propellant.

number of economists wish the cash was burned up!

As otto pointed out, your comments would be improved if you actually researched these issues.

For strategic military reasons & collecting widespread political support?
If you researched just for your state? Even a small, rural state.
You would be astonished how much Federal funds are distributed to your State Universities & local
colleges, local industries & subcontractors.
From NASA & other Federal science programs.
Subsidies to Corporations for their campaign contributions.
Military & out of the Black Budget of the acronyms.
(if you don't know the acronyms?
they are none of your business.
you are just a citizen & taxpayer.
for a self-proclaimed patriot ignorance is bliss.
go watch TV sports & obey the commercials!)

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