Video: Why Antarctic fish don't freeze to death

December 6, 2018, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

The notothenioid fishes that inhabit the Antarctic Ocean have evolved an unusual adaptation to living in icy waters.

Their contains that prevent ice from growing within the fishes' bodies and actually lower the freezing temperature of their tissues.

In this video, Reactions meets these bizarre animals:

Explore further: Antifreeze proteins in Antarctic fishes prevent freezing... and melting

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