New study on low noise and high-performance transistors could bring innovations in electronics, sensing

December 19, 2018 by Brandy Webb, Kansas State University

A research study on low noise and high-performance transistors led by Suprem Das, assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering, in collaboration with researchers at Purdue University, was recently published by Physical Review Applied.

The study has demonstrated micro/nano-scale transistors made of two-dimensional atomic thin materials that show high performance and . The devices are less than one-hundredth of the diameter of a single human hair and could be key to innovating electronics and precision sensing.

Many researchers worldwide are focusing attention on building the next generation of transistors from atomic scale "exotic" 2-D materials such as molybdenum di-selenide. These materials are promising because they show high-performance transistor-action that may, in the future, replace today's silicon electronics. However, very few of them are looking at yet another important aspect: the inherent electronic noise in this new class of materials. Electronic noise is ubiquitous to all devices and circuits and only worsens when the material becomes atomic thin.

A recent study conducted by Das' research team has systematically shown that if one can control the layer thickness between 10 and 15-atomic thin in a transistor, the will not only show high performance—such as turning the switch "on"—but also experience very low electronic noise. This unique finding is essential to building several enabling technologies in electronics and sensing using a number of emerging 2-D . This research is a comprehensive effort of a previous finding, where Das' team conducted the first study on noise in MoSe2 .

Explore further: Tiny diamond invention could help launch rockets into space

More information: Jiseok Kwon et al, Correlating Electronic Transport and 1/ f Noise in MoSe2 Field-Effect Transistors, Physical Review Applied (2018). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevApplied.10.064029

Related Stories

Tiny diamond invention could help launch rockets into space

October 25, 2018

Scientists at ANU have invented tiny diamond electronic parts that could outperform and be more durable than today's devices in high-radiation environments such as rocket engines, helping to reach the next frontier in space.

Scientists Develop World's Fastest Graphene Transistor

December 19, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- IBM Researchers today announced that they demonstrated the operation of graphene field-effect transistors at GHz frequencies, and achieved the highest frequencies reported so far using this novel non-silicon ...

Recommended for you

Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

January 18, 2019

An international research team led by physicists from the University of Cologne has implemented a new variant of the basic double-slit experiment using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the European Synchrotron ESRF ...

New thermoelectric material delivers record performance

January 17, 2019

Taking advantage of recent advances in using theoretical calculations to predict the properties of new materials, researchers reported Thursday the discovery of a new class of half-Heusler thermoelectric compounds, including ...

Zirconium isotope a master at neutron capture

January 17, 2019

The probability that a nucleus will absorb a neutron is important to many areas of nuclear science, including the production of elements in the cosmos, reactor performance, nuclear medicine and defense applications.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.