NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants reorganizing

December 10, 2018, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
On Dec. 10, 2018 the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Owen in the Gulf of Carpentaria, just west of Queensland. Credit: NASA/NRL

The remnants of Tropical Cyclone have been lingering in the Southern Pacific Ocean for days. On Dec. 10, the storm finally appeared more organized on satellite imagery providing forecasters with a strong indication that it may be reborn as a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Gulf of Carpentaria and saw the storm.

On Dec. 10 at 0100 UTC (Dec. 9 at 8 p.m. EST), Owen's remnants were located near 16.1 degrees south latitude and 144.6 degrees east longitude, approximately 282 nautical miles east-northeast of Mornington Island, Australia, and just west of the northern tip of Queensland.

On Dec. 10 at 0410 UTC (Dec. 9 at 11:10 p.m. EST, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the remnants. VIIRS revealed a consolidating low level circulation center with deep convection building over the center.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted: "Sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Carpentaria are conducive for future tropical cyclone development. Multiple [computer forecast] models indicate development over the next 24-36 hours with a westward trajectory."

Explore further: NASA-NOAA Satellite finds a large Tropical Cyclone Gaja

Related Stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 33W dissipating

November 26, 2018

When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Ca Mau Peninsula it captured a visible image of the dissipating former Tropical Cyclone 33W.The Ca Mau Peninsula is the southernmost area of Vietnam, located between the ...

NASA-NOAA satellite finds Owen fading in the Coral Sea

December 4, 2018

Tropical Cyclone Owen appeared disorganized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Coral Sea in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Imagery from the Suomi NPP satellite showed that Owen was being stretched out and had weakened ...

Recommended for you

Coffee-based colloids for direct solar absorption

March 22, 2019

Solar energy is one of the most promising resources to help reduce fossil fuel consumption and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions to power a sustainable future. Devices presently in use to convert solar energy into thermal ...

Paleontologists report world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex

March 22, 2019

University of Alberta paleontologists have just reported the world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Canada. The 13-metre-long T. rex, nicknamed "Scotty," lived in prehistoric Saskatchewan ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.