'Donald' makes annual list of worst passwords of the year

December 16, 2018 by Ben Tobin, Usa Today
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Want a strong online password to protect your personal information? You should probably avoid drawing inspiration from President Donald Trump.

For the first time, 'donald' made software company SplashData's annual list of the Top 100 worst passwords, coming in at No. 23.

"Sorry, Mr. President, but this is not —using your name or any common name as a password is a dangerous decision," SplashData CEO Morgan Slain said in a statement. "Hackers have great success using celebrity names, terms from and sports, and simple keyboard patterns to break into accounts online because they know so many people are using those easy-to-remember combinations."

Several other common names, such as "william" (No. 96), "sophie" (No. 51) and "daniel" (No. 34), also appeared on the list.

Topping off the list of terrible passwords were "123456789" at No. 3, "password" at No. 2 and "123456" at No. 1. This year marked the fifth-straight year that "123456" and "password" kept their top two spots on the list, SplashData said.

SplashData compiled its list by evaluating over five million leaked passwords to determine which passwords were used the most. The company estimates 10 percent of people have used at least one of the 25 worst passwords on this year's list, with roughly 3 percent using the worst password, "123456."

Below is a list of the top 25 worst passwords of 2018. SplashData's entire list is on their site.

Top 25 worst of 2018

1. 123456

2. password

3. 123456789

4. 12345678

5. 12345

6. 111111

7. 1234567

8. sunshine

9. qwerty

10. iloveyou

11. princess

12. admin

13. welcome

14. 666666

15. abc123

16. football

17. 123123

18. monkey

19. 654321

20. !@#$%^&*

21. charlie

22. aa123456

23. donald

24. password1

25. qwerty123

Explore further: 'Password' no longer the Internet's worst password

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rrwillsj
5 / 5 (1) Dec 16, 2018
This look of incredulity on my face?

Is that anyone would believe that the senile buffoon, the Bogus POTUS, uses any sort of password.

Not without the express permission of his pimp. putin. That guy has to watch closely over his stable.

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