Video: ESA's future Lagrange mission to monitor the sun

November 8, 2018, European Space Agency
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Space weather describes the changing environment throughout the Solar System, driven by the energetic and unpredictable nature of our sun. Solar wind, solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections can result in geomagetic storms on Earth, potentially damaging satellites in space and the technologies that rely on them, as well as infrastructure on the ground.

ESA's future Lagrange mission will keep constant watch on the sun. The satellite, located at the fifth Lagrange point, will send early warning of potentially harmful solar activity before it affects satellites in orbit or power grids on the ground, giving operators the time to act to protect vital infrastructure.

ESA is now working with European industry to assess options for the spacecraft and its mission, with initial proposals expected early in 2020.

Credit: ESA - European Space Agency

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