Egyptian archaeologists find parts of pharaoh's booth

October 25, 2018
Egyptian archaeologists find parts of pharaoh's booth
This Oct. 2018 photo released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows parts of a booth with a seat that belonged to Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity, in eastern Cairo's Matariya neighborhood, Egypt. Egyptologist Mamdouh el-Damaty says the structure was probably used in celebrations and for public gatherings, and dates back to the 19th Dynasty. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AP)

Egypt says archaeologists have uncovered parts of a booth with a seat that belonged to famous pharaoh Ramses II, or "Ramses the Great," one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity.

Thursday's statement from the Antiquities Ministry says the artifacts were found during an excavation in eastern Cairo's Matariya neighborhood.

Egyptologist Mamdouh el-Damaty says the structure was probably used in celebrations and for public gatherings, and dates back to the 19th Dynasty.

Ramses II ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago. He is credited with expanding ancient Egypt's reach to present-day Syria and Sudan, earning him the title "Ramses the Great."

Egypt frequently announces archaeological discoveries, hoping this will spur interest in its ancient treasures and revive tourism, which was hit hard by political turmoil following the 2011 uprising.

This Oct. 2018 photo, released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows part of a booth with a seat that belonged to Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity, in eastern Cairo's Matariya neighborhood, Egypt. Egyptologist Mamdouh el-Damaty says the structure was probably used in celebrations and for public gatherings, and dates back to the 19th Dynasty. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AP)
Egyptian archaeologists find parts of pharaoh's booth
This Oct. 2018 photo, released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows archaeologists uncovering parts of a booth with a seat that belonged to Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity, in eastern Cairo's Matariya neighborhood, Egypt. Egyptologist Mamdouh el-Damaty says the structure was probably used in celebrations and for public gatherings, and dates back to the 19th Dynasty. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AP)

Explore further: Parts of Ramses II statue found in southern Egypt

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