Egypt archaeologists discover massive statue in Cairo slum

Archeologists in Egypt discover massive statue in Cairo slum
A boy rides his his bicycle past a recently discovered statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, March 10, 2017. Archeologists in Egypt have discovered a massive statue that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country's most famous ancient rulers. The colossus, whose head was pulled from mud and groundwater by a bulldozer on Thursday, is around eight meters (yards) tall and was discovered by a German-Egyptian team. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

Archaeologists in Egypt discovered a massive statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country's most famous ancient rulers.

The colossus, whose head was pulled from mud and groundwater by a bulldozer and seen by The Associated Press on Friday, is around eight meters (yards) high and was discovered by a German-Egyptian team.

Egyptologist Khaled Nabil Osman said the statue was an "impressive find" and the area is likely full of other buried antiquities.

"It was the main cultural place of ancient Egypt, even the bible mentions it," he said. "The sad news is that the whole area needs to be cleaned up, the sewers and market should be moved."

Ramses II ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago and was a great builder whose effigy can be seen at a string of archaeological sites across the country.

Massive statues of the warrior-king can be seen in Luxor, and his most famous monument is found in Abu Simbel, near Sudan.

Osman said that the massive head removed from the ground was made in the style that Ramses was depicted, and was likely him. The site contained parts of both that statue and another.

Egypt is packed with ancient treasures, many of which still remain buried. The sites open to tourists are often empty of late as the country has suffered from political instability that has scared off foreigners since its Arab Spring uprising in 2011.

  • Archeologists in Egypt discover massive statue in Cairo slum
    People gather near water which covered the site of a recently discovered statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, March 10, 2017. Archeologists in Egypt have discovered a massive statue that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country's most famous ancient rulers. The colossus, whose head was pulled from mud and groundwater by a bulldozer on Thursday, is around eight meters (yards) tall and was discovered by a German-Egyptian team. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
  • Archeologists in Egypt discover massive statue in Cairo slum
    A child poses for a picture past a recently discovered statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, March 10, 2017. Archeologists in Egypt have discovered a massive statue that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country 's most famous ancient rulers. The colossus, whose head was pulled from mud and groundwater by a bulldozer on Thursday, is around eight meters (yards) tall and was discovered by a German-Egyptian team. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
  • Archeologists in Egypt discover massive statue in Cairo slum
    People walk past a recently discovered statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, March 10, 2017. Archeologists in Egypt have discovered a massive statue that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country 's most famous ancient rulers. The colossus, whose head was pulled from mud and groundwater by a bulldozer on Thursday, is around eight meters (yards) tall and was discovered by a German-Egyptian team. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

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Mar 11, 2017
Ozymandias - Shelley

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—"Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away."

Mar 11, 2017
One era's junk is another era's treasure. Which teaches us - never get rid of anything.

I like the picture above of the 2 babes in burkinis standing by the pool at the cairo hilton. Hubba.

Mar 12, 2017
IT is a head statue of an alien 'gray'......elongated head with face at lower end. Maybe a human alien cross since greys have hardly any nose or mouth. Notice large eyes on statue and unearthly face. Notice no line on the head to show any kind of headgear. That head is ALL his....or the one it depicts. Also no way of really checking the age of a cut stone object. It could be 10,500 years old for all we know and probably is.

Mar 13, 2017
Savages will be wiping out Egypt's antiquities the way they did in Palmyra.

Mar 13, 2017
Notice large eyes on statue and unearthly face. Notice no line on the head to show any kind of headgear
What you think is an eye is a gouge. There is a remnant of an eye below what is clearly a line indicating the edge of the headgear.
no way of really checking the age of a cut stone object
One of many dependable ways is to compare the style of adornment and craftsmanship with other artifacts whose ages are confirmed.

This is why ufonuts are so easy to discredit. They just make stuff up.

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