Past NASA chiefs gather for space agency's 60th anniversary

Past NASA chiefs gather for space agency's 60th anniversary
In this photo provided by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), from left, former NASA Administrators Richard Truly, Daniel Goldin, Sean O'Keefe, Michael Griffin and Charles Bolden and current NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and former NASA Historian Roger Launius, pose for a photo, Monday, Sept. 17, 2018, in Orlando, Fla. The group gathered to mark the upcoming 60th anniversary of NASA, during a meeting of AIAA. (AIAA via AP)

NASA chiefs going back 30 years have come together to mark the space agency's 60th anniversary.

Five former NASA administrators joined current boss Jim Bridenstine in Orlando on Monday. It was the largest gathering ever of NASA heads and included every administrator since 1989. The conference was arranged by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

The longest-serving administrator, Daniel Goldin of the 1990s, told Bridenstine there's more to NASA than and that the science and technology programs can help draw more .

Richard Truly of the post-Challenger shuttle era agreed, but noted humans need to explore.

Bridenstine, meanwhile, ran down NASA's latest plans for sending astronauts back to the moon.

Moonwalker Buzz Aldrin was present for the panel discussion.

NASA began operations on Oct. 1, 1958.


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