Image: Time-lapse sequence of Jupiter's north

August 28, 2018, NASA
Credit: NASA

Striking atmospheric features in Jupiter's northern hemisphere are captured in this series of color-enhanced images from NASA's Juno spacecraft.

An anticyclonic white oval, called N5-AWO, can be seen at center left of the first image (at far left) and appears slightly higher in the second and third images. A tempest known as the Little Red Spot is visible near the bottom of the second and third images. The reddish-orange band that is prominently displayed in the fourth and fifth images is the North North Temperate Belt.

From left to right, this sequence of images was taken between 9:54 p.m. and 10:11 p.m. PDT on July 15 (12:54 a.m. and 1:11 a.m. EDT on July 16), as the spacecraft performed its 14th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno's altitude ranged from about 15,700 to 3,900 miles (25,300 to 6,200 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a latitude of approximately 69 to 36 degrees.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager.

Explore further: Image: Jovian jet stream

More information: JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam

More information about Juno at: www.nasa.gov/juno , missionjuno.swri.edu

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