Image: Exposed bedrock on the Red Planet's hale crater

June 1, 2018, NASA
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This image from MRO, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the Red Planet's Hale Crater, a large impact crater (more than 62 miles, or 100 kilometers, across) with a suite of interesting features such as active gullies, active recurring slope lineae (long markings that are dark or bright) and extensive icy ejecta flows.

There are also exposed diverse (colorful) bedrock units.

Explore further: Image: Gullies of Matara Crater

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