Flights disrupted as Bali volcano shoots towering ash column

June 28, 2018

The Mount Agung volcano on Bali shot ash 2,000 meters (6,600 feet) into the atmosphere Thursday, disrupting the travel plans of thousands as several airlines canceled flights from the Indonesian tourist island.

The regional volcanic ash advisory center in Darwin, Australia, said winds could carry the ash southwest toward Bali's international airport and Java, Indonesia's most densely populated island.

A duty manager at Ngurah Rai International Airport, Darta Pande, said many flights were continuing to operate.

The airport's online flight information board showed Australian airlines Jetstar, Virgin Australia and Qantas had canceled flights to and from the island. Korean Air and AirAsia also canceled some flights.

Its public relations department said 26 international inbound and outbound flights had been canceled, affecting nearly 5,000 travelers. Some 10 domestic flights were also canceled, affecting more than 1,700 passengers.

Agung, about 70 kilometers (45 miles) northeast of Bali's tourist hotspot of Kuta, last had a major eruption in 1963, killing about 1,100 people. It had a dramatic increase in activity last year, forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands of people, but had quietened by early this year. Authorities lowered its alert status from the highest level in February.

Indonesia, an archipelago of more than 250 million people, sits on the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and is prone to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Government seismologists monitor more than 120 active volcanoes.

Explore further: Bali volcano emits wispy plume of steam, flights resume

Related Stories

Bali volcano emits wispy plume of steam, flights resume

December 4, 2017

Gushing ash from Bali's Mount Agung volcano has dissipated into a wispy plume of steam, and Australian airlines that canceled some flights to the Indonesian resort island on the weekend have returned to near-normal schedules.

Bali volcano dusts resorts in ash; Lombok airport closes

November 26, 2017

A volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali has rumbled to life with eruptions that dusted nearby resorts and villages with ash and forced the closure of the small international airport on neighboring Lombok island as towering ...

Stranded in Bali tourists lampooned online for complaints

December 1, 2017

Australian tourists who complained about being stranded on tropical Bali when volcanic ash closed its airport have been roasted online as out of touch with the hardships faced by Indonesians forced to flee their homes.

American Airlines fixes computers, delays go on

April 16, 2013

American Airlines says it has fixed an outage in its main reservations system that is disrupting travel for thousands of passengers whose flights have been delayed or canceled.

Recommended for you

Complete world map of tree diversity

February 21, 2019

Biodiversity is one of Earth's most precious resources. However, for most places in the world, scientists only have a tiny picture of what this diversity actually is. Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity ...

'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D

February 21, 2019

Miniaturization is the watchword of progress. Nanoscience, studying structures on the scale of a few atoms, has been at the forefront of chemistry for some time now. Recently, researchers at the University of Tokyo developed ...

Water is more homogeneous than expected

February 21, 2019

In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases, even under ambient conditions. However, new X-ray spectroscopic analyses at BESSY II, ESRF and Swiss ...

Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics

February 21, 2019

The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic, finds a review published in Frontiers in Chemistry. Originating ...

Female golden snub-nosed monkeys share nursing of young

February 21, 2019

An international team of researchers including The University of Western Australia and China's Central South University of Forestry and Technology has discovered that female golden snub-nosed monkeys in China are happy to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.