Distortive effects of short distance photographs on nasal appearance: The selfie effect

March 1, 2018, Rutgers University
Distortive effects of short distance photographs on nasal appearance: The selfie effect
Portrait A is taken at 12 inches; portrait B is taken at 60 inches. Credit: Boris Paskhover

Does my smartphone make my nose look big? It might, according to researchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

People take billions of selfies every day without realizing the distortive effects of the camera's close proximity, prompting many to possibly develop a skewed self image.

Boris Paskhover, an assistant professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School's Department of Otolaryngology who specializes in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, frequently was shown selfies as examples of why patients were requesting surgery to make their noses smaller.

"Young adults are constantly taking selfies to post to social media and think those images are representative of how they really look, which can have an impact on their emotional state," he said. "I want them to realize that when they take a they are in essence looking into a portable funhouse mirror."

Paskhover sought a better way to explain to patients why they cannot use selfies to evaluate their nose size so they can improve their self-perception and make more informed decisions about their health. He worked with Ohad Fried, a research fellow at Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, to develop a that shows nasal distortion created by photos taken at close range.

Distortive effects of short distance photographs on nasal appearance: The selfie effect
The calculation of extent of distortion. Credit: Ohad Fried

The Rutgers-Stanford model, published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, shows that an average selfie, taken about 12 inches from the face, makes the nasal base appear approximately 30 percent wider and the nasal tip 7 percent wider than if the photograph had been taken at 5 feet, a standard portrait distance that provides a more proportional representation of .

The mathematical model is based on the average head and facial feature measurements obtained from a selection of racially and ethnically diverse participants. The model determined the magnitude of the distortive effect by presenting the face as a collection of parallel planes perpendicular to the main camera axis. It calculated the changes to the ratio between the nose's breadth and the width between the two cheekbones at various camera distances.

How selfies drive people's self-image is a public health issue, Paskhover said. The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons, reports that 55 percent of surgeons say people come to them seeking cosmetic procedures for improved selfies.

Explore further: An app for the perfect selfie: Algorithm direct user where to position camera for best photo

More information: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery (2018). DOI: 10.1001/jamafacial.2018.0009

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someone11235813
5 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2018
I fear for the boundless stupidity of the human race. How is it possible to not be aware of the wide angle of phone cameras. Just a slight change in angle can make you forehead bulge or chin bulge and distant views disappear into specs. Do people who see a black screen not realising their phone is off, think they have suddenly become blind?
GaryB
not rated yet Mar 04, 2018
I fear for the boundless stupidity of the human race. How is it possible to not be aware of the wide angle of phone cameras.

This is nothing, you should see who they elected president...
NoLeads
not rated yet Mar 04, 2018
I fear for the boundless stupidity of the human race. How is it possible to not be aware of the wide angle of phone cameras.

This is nothing, you should see who they elected president...


the other option was the devil herself...why did the feds not lock her up after the DOJ chairmen and committee both called for her arrest. holding factual evidence of her tyranny towards America while in office. oh yeah!, bill met with the director while her wife was under investigation at the airport. and low and behold, a week later its frozen in time.
the fact you rely on this 200-year-old system is the issue. not so much these psychopaths who chose to run for office. they are an issue for the human race as a whole generally.
regardless who sits in the chair, there is a faction that does not leave power every 4 years and others who fund these campaigns to the point of ownership.
much more to the puzzle than a man named donald.

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