'Simple' bacteria found to organize in elaborate patterns

Over the past several years, research from University of California San Diego biologist Gürol Süel's laboratory has uncovered a series of remarkable features exhibited by clusters of bacteria that live together in communities ...

A mathematical model may give more efficient climate talks

Achieving consensus among countries in global climate negotiations is a long and complicated process. Researchers at Linköping University have developed a mathematical model that describes the achievement of the 2015 Paris ...

What influences the rise of influencers?

A model to describe the formation of online communities and rise of influencers on social media platforms, based on the quality of user generated content, is reported in a study published in Nature Communications. The findings ...

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Mathematical model

A mathematical model uses mathematical language to describe a system. Mathematical models are used not only in the natural sciences and engineering disciplines (such as physics, biology, earth science, meteorology, and engineering) but also in the social sciences (such as economics, psychology, sociology and political science); physicists, engineers, computer scientists, and economists use mathematical models most extensively. The process of developing a mathematical model is termed 'mathematical modelling' (also modeling).

Eykhoff (1974) defined a mathematical model as 'a representation of the essential aspects of an existing system (or a system to be constructed) which presents knowledge of that system in usable form'.

Mathematical models can take many forms, including but not limited to dynamical systems, statistical models, differential equations, or game theoretic models. These and other types of models can overlap, with a given model involving a variety of abstract structures.

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