New method reveals where DNA is at risk in the cell

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new sequencing method that makes it possible to map how DNA is spatially organized in the cell nucleus—revealing which genomic regions are at higher risk of mutation ...

Ignorance would be bliss: the family ties that grind

The ability to recognize relatives can make life more dangerous for the female of the species, new research carried out at the University of St Andrews, the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse and the University of Valencia ...

When do plants help or hinder each other?

When plants grow close together, each individual plant has less chance of doing well—at least, that was the accepted wisdom in environmental research. Now Dr. Ruichang Zhang and Professor Katja Tielbörger from the Institute ...

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Mathematical model

A mathematical model uses mathematical language to describe a system. Mathematical models are used not only in the natural sciences and engineering disciplines (such as physics, biology, earth science, meteorology, and engineering) but also in the social sciences (such as economics, psychology, sociology and political science); physicists, engineers, computer scientists, and economists use mathematical models most extensively. The process of developing a mathematical model is termed 'mathematical modelling' (also modeling).

Eykhoff (1974) defined a mathematical model as 'a representation of the essential aspects of an existing system (or a system to be constructed) which presents knowledge of that system in usable form'.

Mathematical models can take many forms, including but not limited to dynamical systems, statistical models, differential equations, or game theoretic models. These and other types of models can overlap, with a given model involving a variety of abstract structures.

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