Tropical Storm watch up in Guam, NASA sees 02W form

February 9, 2018, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of the newly developed tropical depression 02W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Feb. 9 at 0010 UTC (Feb. 8 at 7:10 p.m. EST). Credit: NASA/NRL

Tropical Depression 02W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean late on February 8 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

The MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of the newly developed tropical 02W on Feb. 9 at 0010 UTC (Feb. 8 at 7:10 p.m. EST). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that infrared imagery on Feb. 9 showed "a developing low level circulation center with very little convection associated with it. The initial position is based on an AMSU [instrument] microwave image [from Feb. 9 at 6:44 a.m. EST (1144 UTC) showing weak banding and that nearly all convection has dissipated."

National Weather Service (NWS) in Tiyan, Guam noted that a Tropical Storm Watch remains in effect for Fais, Ulithi, Yap and Ngulu in Yap State. There is also a High surf advisory in effect until 6 a.m. CHST on Saturday, Feb. 10 with a high risk of rip currents along north and east facing reefs. The NWS said "Expect hazardous surf of 8 to 11 feet along north facing reefs tonight (Feb. 9). Surf may fall below hazardous levels Saturday morning." In addition there is a small craft advisory in effect until Saturday at 6 p.m. CHST (local time).

On Feb. 9 at 1200 UTC (10 p.m. CHST on Feb. 8) the center of Tropical Depression 02W was located near Latitude 10.0 degrees North and Longitude 145.0 degrees East. That puts the center approximately 240 miles south of Guam. Tropical Depression 02W has moved toward the west-southwest at 14 mph and is forecast to continue a general westward track with a slight increase in forward speed tonight. Maximum sustained winds remains at 35 mph.

NWS in Guam noted that the latest computer guidance continues to suggest Tropical Depression 02W will continue to develop and track generally westward over the next several days. This motion would take it passing south of the Mariana Islands tonight and then toward Yap State and the Republic of Palau this weekend.

Explore further: NASA sees Tropical Storm Saola near Guam

More information: For updated forecasts from NWS Guam, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/guam/.

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