Lebanon displays stolen ancient artifacts returned from US

February 2, 2018
Lebanon displays stolen ancient artifacts returned from US
The ancient sculpture "Bull's Head" is displayed at the Lebanese National museum during a ceremony celebrating the return of three ancient sculptures from the United States, in Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018. The treasures once owned by private collectors and valued at more than $5 million US were ordered returned to Lebanon by the Manhattan district attorney. They were stolen from a temple during the Lebanese 1975-90 civil war and confiscated in New York in the past few months. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Lebanon has displayed three stolen ancient sculptures that were returned from the United States recently.

The treasures arrived home last month and were put on display at the National Museum in Beirut on Friday.

The pieces include a marble bull's head dating to about 360 B.C., excavated at a Phoenician temple in southern Lebanon decades ago.

Lebanon's Culture Minister Ghattas Khoury told reporters at the museum that "we are all committed to repatriate as many of these objects, wherever they are."

The treasures were once owned by private collectors and valued at more than $5 million. They were ordered returned to Lebanon by the Manhattan district attorney.

They were stolen from a temple during the Lebanese 1975-90 and confiscated in New York in the past few months.

The ancient the ancient sculpture "Calf Bearer" is displayed at the Lebanese National Museum during a ceremony celebrating the return of three ancient sculptures from the United States, in Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018. The treasures once owned by private collectors and valued at more than $5 million US were ordered returned to Lebanon by the Manhattan district attorney. They were stolen from a temple during the Lebanese 1975-90 civil war and confiscated in New York in the past few months.(AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Lebanon displays stolen ancient artifacts returned from US
The three ancient sculptures Bull's Head, left, Calf Bearer, center, and Torso, right, are displayed at the Lebanese National museum during a ceremony celebrating the return of three ancient sculptures rom the United States, in Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018. The treasures once owned by private collectors and valued at more than $5 million US were ordered returned to Lebanon by the Manhattan district attorney.They were stolen from a temple during the Lebanese 1975-90 civil war and confiscated in New York in the past few months. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Explore further: Ancient Phoenician DNA from Sardinia, Lebanon reflects settlement, integration, mobility

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