Cold-stunned manatees, sea turtles warming up at SeaWorld

January 11, 2018

Some marine animals stunned by cold weather nationwide are warming up at SeaWorld in Florida.

In a statement this week, theme park spokeswoman Suzanne Pelisson Beasley said SeaWorld rescue teams are on track to have one of their most active seasons ever.

So far, 12 manatees have been relocated from South Carolina to Florida. Over 200 seas turtles have been rescued from frigid Texas waters. And two dozen from New England have been flown to Florida for rehabilitation.

Last year, Pelisson Beasley said SeaWorld teams assisted in just 38 cold-related rescues.

The Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network says roughly 2,100 cold-stunned green sea turtles were documented along the Texas coast in the first week of January.

Florida wildlife officials say they have rescued about 900 sea turtles statewide since Jan. 3.

Explore further: 25 stranded sea turtles rescued from cold waters of Cape Cod

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