Video: Cassini's legacy and the atmospheric chemistry of Titan

September 15, 2017, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, is set to end on Sept. 15.

The mission has told us a great deal about the unique and unexpected chemistry of Saturn's moon Titan, and it has changed the way we think about our own planet and the entire solar system.

Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

Explore further: Video: The historic adventure of Cassini-Huygens

Related Stories

Astronomers bid farewell to $3.9 bn Saturn spacecraft

September 15, 2017

Astronomers around the world bid farewell Friday to NASA's famed Cassini spacecraft, which launched 20 years ago to circle Saturn and transformed the way we think about life elsewhere in the solar system.

Cassini readies final plunge into Saturn

September 13, 2017

NASA's Cassini probe is counting its final hours before one last plunge into Saturn on Friday that will cap a fruitful 13-year mission that greatly expanded knowledge about the gas giant.

Huygens on Titan, First Images 2:45 p.m. EST

January 14, 2005

European Space Agency mission managers for the Huygens probe confirm that data of the probe's descent to Saturn's moon Titan are being received. They expect to see first images around 2:45 p.m. Eastern Time. The data was ...

Huygens mission: Ten years at Titan

January 14, 2015

Celebrating the 10th anniversary of the pioneering Huygens mission to Saturn's moon Titan, the first successful landing on an outer Solar System world.

Recommended for you

Coffee-based colloids for direct solar absorption

March 22, 2019

Solar energy is one of the most promising resources to help reduce fossil fuel consumption and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions to power a sustainable future. Devices presently in use to convert solar energy into thermal ...

Paleontologists report world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex

March 22, 2019

University of Alberta paleontologists have just reported the world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Canada. The 13-metre-long T. rex, nicknamed "Scotty," lived in prehistoric Saskatchewan ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.