Video: How superhydrophobic materials stay totally dry

August 8, 2017, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Raincoats, car windshields, waterproof phones: They all use a little chemistry to stay dry. Inspired by nature, chemists use extremely water-fearing, or superhydrophobic, coatings to repel water from surfaces to keep them dry.

Watch as the Reactions team uses a high-speed camera and some brave volunteers to bring the science of staying dry to life:

Explore further: New material to revolutionize water proofing

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