Japanese scientists create ice cream that doesn't melt

August 7, 2017 by Bob Yirka report
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A team of Japanese scientists has developed a way to make and sell a type of ice cream that does not melt, capitalizing on a discovery made accidentally by a chef. Most ice cream starts melting just moments after it is scooped from a container and placed into a bowl or on a cone. Because of this, people have taken to eating it quickly. But now that may change, as a team in Japan has found a way to maintain the shape of ice cream no matter how slowly it is eaten.

The ice reportedly came about by mistake after a chef in Japan was asked to find a way to use strawberries grown in areas impacted by the earthquake and tsunami back in 2011—they wouldn't grow in a normal shape, so customers wouldn't buy them. The chef tried to use the strawberries in other ways, and at one point, complained that they caused cream to solidify. Hearing of the complaint, a team at Kanazawa University took a closer look and discovered that a compound called polyphenol in the strawberries was responsible for solidifying the cream. The extract, they found, makes it difficult for water and oil to separate, which is what occurs in regular ice cream. They tried mixing it with ice cream and found it would prevent the ice cream from melting.

Because the extract is completely natural, it did not require testing by health inspectors—instead, it was made available to local shop owners who gladly began selling the ice cream in prepressed shapes on sticks or forms to customers who were more than happy to try it. Local media picked up the story, and soon, the news spread around the world. Local newspapers have been running stories reporting on how the ice cream tastes (apparently still good) and how well it stands up to warm temperatures. Some customers would hold their ice cream for many minutes in direct sunlight to see if it will melt. Others took a harsher approach, subjecting samples to hair dryers or other artificially heated environments. By all accounts, the ice cream maintains its shape for several hours in , and still feels chilly in the mouth. Because the new is still so new, it is not clear if it will migrate to other countries. Currently, it is only for sale in Japan.

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12 comments

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MontgomeryScott
not rated yet Aug 07, 2017
Hopefully they obtained a declaration of non-infringement determination or else a certain candy maker I know is going to shove a Everlasting Gobstopper right up their legal - - -.
rrrander
1 / 5 (1) Aug 07, 2017
We have frozen yogurt and flavoured ice. Aren't they bad enough? Just do what McDonald's does; make it (their milkshakes) with cornstarch instead of ice cream. Cheap...
adam_russell_9615
not rated yet Aug 08, 2017
Thats weird. Ive had strawberries in ice cream and never noticed any effect.
6502
5 / 5 (2) Aug 08, 2017
No more Ice Cream Glove venture capital funding.
Captain Stumpy
1 / 5 (1) Aug 08, 2017
Thats weird. Ive had strawberries in ice cream and never noticed any effect.
@adam_russell_9615

try making home made ice cream with strawberries (and real cream, not the mix from wal-mart, etc)

first make the ice cream without the strawberries
then make it with the strawberries

EmceeSquared
not rated yet Aug 08, 2017
"By all accounts, the ice cream maintains its shape for several hours in warm weather, and still feels chilly in the mouth."

I don't know whether polyphenol will cause melted ice cream to retain its shape. But it certainly will not make melted ice cream "still feel chilly in the mouth" any more than without polyphenol. The additive isn't changing the basic laws of thermodynamics. That statement is obviously a lie.

So I expect the rest is a lie. Right Bob Yirka?
Da Schneib
not rated yet Aug 08, 2017
Warm ice cream? Ew.
Dingbone
Aug 08, 2017
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Ojorf
not rated yet Aug 08, 2017
Warm ice cream? Yum.
Parsec
not rated yet Aug 09, 2017
"By all accounts, the ice cream maintains its shape for several hours in warm weather, and still feels chilly in the mouth."

I don't know whether polyphenol will cause melted ice cream to retain its shape. But it certainly will not make melted ice cream "still feel chilly in the mouth" any more than without polyphenol. The additive isn't changing the basic laws of thermodynamics. That statement is obviously a lie.

So I expect the rest is a lie. Right Bob Yirka?


I don't know about that. While I quit smoking about 35 years ago, I still remember how "chilly" menthol cigarettes felt. Some things really do have a taste that could easily be described that way.
EmceeSquared
not rated yet Aug 09, 2017
Parsec:
I still remember how "chilly" menthol cigarettes felt. Some things really do have a taste that could easily be described that way.


Polyphenols don't taste cold, they taste bitter.

Yirka didn't mention that this ice cream doesn't melt but evidently it does taste bad.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Aug 09, 2017
Of course you know trump invented this as well.
https://www.youtu...ElraFHHE

@1:00
Warm ice cream? Yum
And NASA invented this
http://www.thespa...eal.html

Does I has to inform youz all of everything then?

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