Image: A world of snowy dunes on Mars

A world of snowy dunes on Mars
Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

It was spring in the Northern hemisphere when this image was taken on May 21, 2017, at 13:21 local Mars time, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Over the winter, snow and ice have inexorably covered the dunes. Unlike on Earth, this snow and ice is carbon dioxide, better known to us as dry ice.

When the sun starts shining on it in the spring, the ice on the smooth surface of the dune cracks and escaping gas carries dark sand out from the dune below, often creating beautiful patterns. On the rough surface between the dunes, frost is trapped behind small sheltered ridges.


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Image: Frosted dunes on Mars

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Citation: Image: A world of snowy dunes on Mars (2017, August 25) retrieved 25 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-image-world-snowy-dunes-mars.html
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