UK to tighten rules on drones after near-misses with planes

UK to tighten rules on drones after near-misses with planes
In this Feb. 25, 2017 file photo, a drone flies in Hanworth Park in west London, as a British Airways 747 plane in the background prepares to land at Heathrow Airport. British officials announced plans Saturday, July 22, 2017 to further regulate drone use in a bid to prevent accidents and threats to commercial aviation. (John Stillwell/PA via AP, File)

British officials announced plans Saturday to further regulate drone use in a bid to prevent accidents and threats to commercial aviation.

The new rules will require drones that weigh eight ounces (226.79 grams) or more to be registered and users will have to pass a safety awareness exam.

The government acted because of concerns that a midair collision between a drone and an aircraft could cause a major disaster. Pilots have reported numerous near-misses in the last year alone in Britain. Earlier this month London's Gatwick Airport briefly closed its runway over safety concerns when a drone was spotted in the area and several planes had to be diverted.

The British Airline Pilots Association said independent tests show even a small drone could cause severe damage to a helicopter or an airline windscreen. The union's general secretary, Brian Strutton, said pilots "have been warning about the rise in the number of cases of drones being flown irresponsibly close to aircraft and airports for some time."

He said a new report "clearly shows that readily available drones which can be flown by anyone can shatter or go straight through an aircraft windshield or shatter a helicopter rotor. And those impacts would have catastrophic consequences."

British police have also reported a sharp rise in complaints from the public about intrusive drone use.

Aviation Minister Martin Callanan said drones are providing many useful services but that the new regulations are need to prevent the technology from being misused.

"Our measures prioritize protecting the public while maximizing the full potential of drones," he said.

The new rules will make it easier for the government to track drones that have been flown in an allegedly risky manner or that infringed on protected airspace. Details of the registration plan haven't yet been worked out.


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UK pilots warn of disaster, seek tougher rules for drones

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Jul 22, 2017
Could the authors please stop using the term "near miss" when you really mean "nearly hit"? Or better yet, how about a "Close Call."

Jul 24, 2017
Pilots have reported numerous near-misses in the last year alone in Britain.


Most of which turned out false or unproven.

There seems to be a huge hysteria about drones, with pilots reporting birds, weather balloons, lint in the windscreen... as drone sightings, and all sorts of impossible events like spotting a drone 3 km up in the sky going faster than the airplane itself.

http://imgur.com/svzIama

Jul 24, 2017
It seems most planes are able to take rated to hit up to 4lbs worth of bird, and yet they are saying more than 8 ounces of drone is going to take out a plane?
A decent sized drone with a nice camera fitted comes in at around 2lbs so unless you're flying some beast of a drone (expensive professional ones) there shouldn't be a problem surely?
It's simply going to destroy your drone..

The UK is always excellent at killing off new tech markets rather than embracing them and coming up with common sense rules.

Jul 25, 2017
It seems most planes are able to take rated to hit up to 4lbs worth of bird, and yet they are saying more than 8 ounces of drone is going to take out a plane?


There's a device called the chicken gun that fires dead chicken at airplane engines and nacelles to test their bird strike resistance.

There is an urban legend that train companies borrowed the chicken gun for testing windshields for high-speed trains, and were shocked and confused at the amount of damage the gun did - the projectiles were not only breaking through the windshields but embedding themselves into seats farther down the train. When they asked the lenders what they were doing wrong, the reply came, "Gentlemen, thaw your chickens." "


Jul 25, 2017
Hello eikka
You need to go back to the musk hyperloop thread and address the info I posted for you.

It's only right and proper.
Could the authors please stop using the term "near miss" when you really mean "nearly hit"? Or better yet, how about a "Close Call."
-Only counts in horseshoes and handgrenades... although I suppose you could put grenades with proximity fuses on these things-

Jul 25, 2017
Well after much head-pounding and chest-thumping eikka loses yet another one.
https://phys.org/...ins.html

-I can understand why hes so reluctant to engage, and so eager to drop everything and run squealing...

Next time bring your chicken gun.

Jul 27, 2017
Eikka, I was flying an airplane when I hit what I think was probably a seagull. At night. It was a very frightening experience. Had it been on the other side of the windshield, I'd have had very hard time landing.

Ingesting anything in to an engine cowling is not a pleasant prospect. It will result in an emergency landing. I've been through that kind of thing and trust me, though we train for it, it is never trivial.

Do not dismiss this hazard lightly. We may test aircraft for it and practice for this contingency but that doesn't mean we'll just shrug it off after it happens.

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