New Mexico professor seeks to save moon-landing sites

July 18, 2017
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A New Mexico State University anthropology professor is on a mission to save moon-landing sites.

Beth O'Leary is speaking this week in Washington, D.C., on preserving the spots where humans stepped on the surface of the moon.

She is giving presentations at the National Geographic Society and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum to coincide with the 48th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission.

Her new book, "The Final Mission: Preserving NASA's Apollo Sites," looks at the exploration of space from an archaeological and historical-preservation perspective. It also details how various sites in New Mexico, Texas, California, and Florida contributed to the successful Apollo mission.

O'Leary says the Apollo 11 at Tranquility Base, where humans stepped foot on the moon, should be named a National Historic landmark.

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Jeffhans1
not rated yet Jul 18, 2017
If they want to preserve things on the moon, they had better work quickly. No one is going to tell the first lunar prospectors what they can and can't take and salvage if it isn't clearly illegal to do so with enforceable penalties.
geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Jul 21, 2017
It should be pretty easy to protect those lunar landing sites. The knowledge is all over the interwebs of their exact locations in New Mexico.

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