Four lions escape from S.Africa's Kruger Park

July 10, 2017
Kruger Park, which borders Zimbabwe and Mozambique, is home to about 1,500 lions, and nearly the size of Belgium. Animals sometimes slip past the barrier fences, especially during the dry winter season.

Four male lions escaped over the weekend fromm South Africa's famed Kruger National Park, officials said Monday, two months after five others slipped out.

Park management said in a statement that the majestic predators were believed to have sneaked out on Sunday night, and that they had been spotted in a nearby village.

They urged residents to "exercise extra caution" as the hunt for the was underway.

Kruger Park, which borders Zimbabwe and Mozambique, is home to about 1,500 lions, and nearly the size of Belgium. Animals sometimes slip past the barrier fences, especially during the dry winter season.

Two months ago, five other lions escaped from the park.

Four were re-captured in neighbouring farms and one is still on the loose.

Officials said animals usually sneaked out through dry river beds, or used holes dug out by other animals near the fences.

In 2016, a named Sylvester escaped twice within two from another South African . He was eventually re-caught and moved to a different reserve.

Explore further: Two lions, 110 vultures poisoned at S.Africa's Kruger park

Related Stories

One of Africa's largest wildlife relocations begins

June 21, 2017

Conservationists have launched what they call one of Africa's biggest wildlife relocations—the transfer of 7,500 animals over three years to a Mozambican park whose wildlife was nearly wiped out by civil war.

Recommended for you

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves

September 21, 2017

Don't let their appearance fool you: Thimble-sized, dappled in cheerful colors and squishy, poison frogs in fact harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know. With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists ...

Signs of sleep seen in jellyfish

September 21, 2017

Jellyfish snooze just like the rest of us. Like humans, mice, fish and flies, the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea exhibits the telltale signs of sleep, scientists report September 21, 2017 in the journal Current Biology. ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Osiris1
not rated yet Jul 10, 2017
These johnnies maybe looking for mates, or some humans to eat. If one's family was neighbor to this reserve, maybe an investment in a Weatherby 460 magnum rifle would be in order with the appropriate ammo for lion defense. Probably they already have them! Look at that picture of the last thing some human victim sees before being brutally killed and eaten alive! Wouldn't YOU? Out in that bush, "9-1-1" is not available. Neither are phones unless cellies.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.