First half of 2017 ranks 2nd hottest globally, behind 2016

First half of 2017 ranks 2nd hottest globally, behind 2016
In this June 21, 2017 file photo, a man cools off at a water fountain in Liberty Park in Salt Lake City. American meteorologists calculate that the first half of 2017 has been the second warmest on record for Earth, only behind last year. NOAA announced Tuesday, July 18, 2017, Earth's average temperature from January to June has been 57.9 degrees (14.4 degrees Celsius). That's more than a-degree-and-a-half warmer than the 20th century average. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

The first half of 2017 was the second warmest on record for Earth, only behind last year.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Tuesday Earth's from January to June was 57.9 degrees (14.4 degrees Celsius). That's 1.6 degrees warmer than the 20th century average.

Natural El Ninos spike global temperatures. But NOAA climate scientist Ahira Sanchez-Lugo says it is remarkable that 2017 without an El Nino so far beats all but the super El Nino year of 2016.

She says that's the world changing into an ever warming climate.

Record warmth was measured in much of Mexico, western Europe, eastern Russia, eastern Africa and eastern China. The U.S. had its second warmest start.

Globally, June was the third warmest on record. Records go back to 1880.


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Jul 19, 2017
Two words: El Niño

http://ggweather..../oni.htm

Guess what the rest of 2017 and the next several years isn't likely to be? The hottest on record. Natural oscillations of Earth's dynamic climate at work.

Jul 19, 2017
El Niño lasts two to seven years. 11 of the 12 hottest years on record all occurred in the last 14 years. This is not a natural oscillation. Of course, everyone sane understands this.

Jul 19, 2017
aksdad
Natural oscillations of Earth's dynamic climate at work
Do you have any source for this assertion? Something to show the duration/source of these oscillations? When will the upslope of the oscillation end - and we will start to see the temps dropping?

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