Video: The Statue of Liberty's true colors

June 29, 2017, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

The Statue of Liberty is an iconic blue-green symbol of freedom. But did you know she wasn't always that color?

When France gifted Lady Liberty to the U.S., she was a 305-foot statue with reddish-brown copper skin. Her color change is thanks to about 30 years' worth of chemistry in the air of New York City harbor.

See how this monumental statue transitioned from penny red to chocolate brown to glorious liberty green in this Reactions video, just in time for Independence Day:

Explore further: Sun-powered Solar Impulse 2 aircraft reaches Statue of Liberty

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