Searching beyond graphene for new wonder materials

Graphene, the two-dimensional, ultra lightweight and super-strong carbon film, has been hailed as a wonder material since its discovery in 2004. Now researchers are going beyond graphene and preparing other 2-D films with extraordinary properties for applications in wearable electronics, sensors and energy storage. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, surveys this expanding landscape.

Mitch Jacoby, a senior correspondent at C&EN, notes that most 2-D materials have certain features in common: They tend to be flexible, transparent, and can be tuned more easily than their bulk counterparts. Some are electrical conductors, and others are insulators or semiconductors. However, there are some gray areas about what 2-D means. How many layers thick can they be? Do the materials need to be free standing?

While those questions are not fully resolved, researchers have forged ahead with the creation of new ultrathin films with varying properties. They largely fall into five major groups: MXenes, Xenes, organic materials, and nitrides. The materials are in differing stages of development, from laboratory curiosity to demonstration devices.


Explore further

New method of characterizing graphene

More information: "2-D materials go beyond graphene," cen.acs.org/articles/95/i22/2- … beyond-graphene.html
Citation: Searching beyond graphene for new wonder materials (2017, May 31) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-graphene-materials.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
3 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more