Video: How to make tomatoes taste awesome again

March 20, 2017, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Why are so many supermarket tomatoes tasteless and rock hard? In the 1990s, breeders developed a tomato that produces less of the hormone ethylene, so they stay hardened for shipping and then ripen in store. That delayed ripening combined with other breeding moves have made tomatoes bigger, redder and great for shipping, but also less satisfying in salad.

This video shows how scientists are learning how tomatoes mature so that soon you may see and taste totally terrific tomatoes at the supermarket.

Watch the latest Speaking of Chemistry video here:

Explore further: Team discovers key to restoring great tomato flavor

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