SpaceX set to launch its first recycled rocket

March 30, 2017 by Marcia Dunn
This photo made available by SpaceX on Thursday, March 30, 2017 shows the company's Falcon 9 rocket on Kennedy Space Center's historic Pad 39A in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Its launch, scheduled for Thursday will be the first time SpaceX launches one of its reused boosters. (SpaceX via AP)

SpaceX is about to launch its first recycled rocket.

The Falcon 9 rocket is on the pad at Florida's Kennedy Space Center, poised for a Thursday evening liftoff. It's the first time SpaceX founder Elon Musk has tried to fly a salvaged booster. The first stage landed on an ocean platform almost a year ago after a for NASA.

SpaceX refurbished and tested the , which still has its original engines. It'll aim for another sea landing once it hoists a broadcasting satellite for the SES (S-E-S) company of Luxembourg.

Longtime customer SES is getting a discount for agreeing to use a recycled rocket, but won't say how much. Martin Halliwell of SES calls it a "big step" for everyone.

SpaceX looks to save time and money through recycling.

Explore further: SpaceX poised to launch first recycled rocket

Related Stories

SpaceX poised to launch first recycled rocket

March 30, 2017

SpaceX is poised to launch its first recycled rocket on Thursday, using a booster that sent food and supplies to the astronauts living at the International Space Station in April.

Recommended for you

Eclipse 2017: Science from the moon's shadow

December 11, 2017

On Dec. 11, 2017, six researchers discussed initial findings based on observations of the Sun and on Earth gathered during the solar eclipse that stretched across North America on Aug. 21, 2017. Ranging from new information ...

Unravelling the mysteries of extragalactic jets

December 11, 2017

University of Leeds researchers have mathematically examined plasma jets from supermassive black holes to determine why certain types of jets disintegrate into huge plumes.

The initial mass function

December 11, 2017

The gas and dust in giant molecular clouds gradually come together under the influence of gravity to form stars. Precisely how this occurs, however, is incompletely understood. The mass of a star, for example, is by far the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.