New lab-on-a-chip platform seeks to improve pathogen detection

March 24, 2017, Future Science Group

Nuclear amplification testing is commonly used for pathogen detection; however, the process is currently manually intensive and complex, and requires dedicated equipment. This prevents its use in some settings, and pathogen detection in individual samples.

In a bid to solve these issues, Natalia Sandetskaya and colleagues at the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy & Immunology (Leipzig, Germany) have developed a prototype lab-on-a-chip capable of automating the in a single instrument.

"We were motivated by the existing need for making the molecular analysis of complex samples much simpler for the users," commented Sandetskaya. "Our particular applied interest is the detection of the in blood; for instance in sepsis, when only a few microorganisms must be rapidly found in a large volume of blood."

The chip utilizes microfluidics and integrates volume transition, lysis, nucleic acid isolation, amplification (PCR or LAMP), and real-time fluorescence detection. As a single instrument, it could enable diagnostics in situations not previously feasible.

The researchers go on to demonstrate its proof-of-concept in the detection of E. coli and Salmonella bacterial species.

"Although our current prototype of the platform will need further development for this application, we have already demonstrated a high level of integration of very diverse processes without making the system overly complex," noted Sandetskaya.

The team is now planning experiments to evaluate the platform in real-world samples and perfect its design.

The full article "An integrated versatile lab-on-a-chip platform for the isolation and nucleic acid-based detection of pathogens" is available open access at Future Science OA.

Explore further: Laboratory-on-a-chip technique simplifies detection of cancer DNA biomarkers

More information: Natalia Sandetskaya et al, An integrated versatile lab-on-a-chip platform for the isolation and nucleic acid-based detection of pathogens, Future Science OA (2017). DOI: 10.4155/fsoa-2016-0088

Related Stories

Testing for Zika virus: There's an app for that

March 20, 2017

Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated ...

Recommended for you

Observation of quantized heating in quantum matter

February 19, 2019

Shaking a physical system typically heats it up, in the sense that the system continuously absorbs energy. When considering a circular shaking pattern, the amount of energy that is absorbed can potentially depend on the orientation ...

Sound waves let quantum systems 'talk' to one another

February 18, 2019

Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have invented an innovative way for different types of quantum technology to "talk" to each other using sound. The study, published Feb. 11 in Nature ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.