Ancient Ten Commandments tablet sold at auction for $850,000

November 17, 2016

The world's earliest-known stone inscription of the Ten Commandments has sold at auction in Beverly Hills for $850,000.

Heritage Auctions says the sold Wednesday night at a public auction of ancient Biblical archaeology artifacts.

The two-foot square marble slab weighs about 115 pounds and is inscribed in an early Hebrew script called Samaritan.

Heritage says the tablet likely adorned the entrance of a synagogue that was destroyed by the Romans between A.D. 400 and 600, or by the Crusaders in the .

The auction house says the Israeli Antiquities Authorities approved export of the piece to the United States in 2005. The only condition is that it must be displayed in a public museum. Heritage says the new owner is under obligation to do that.

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StudentofSpiritualTeaching
1 / 5 (1) Nov 18, 2016
One can only hope that this public museum will be a police museum, as that would match with the intentional falsification of content by Moses himself. Whoever is interested in the original 10+2 commandments (they should better be called recommendations), here a reference page ow.ly/Elu2306kh2i Those 12 recommendations are accompanied by explanations that go very deep and are inspiring. Right now that book is only available in German, but a translation has been announced for the coming months. You want to visit one of the international FIGU sites for more information.
pntaylor
not rated yet Nov 25, 2016
Hey, Student, try reading the article when you're not stoned.
The headline says "Ancient" not original.

"Heritage says the tablet likely adorned the entrance of a synagogue that was destroyed by the Romans between A.D. 400 and 600, or by the Crusaders in the 11th century."

Again Not original, Replication.
Moron.

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