Astronaut John Glenn's historic flight plan sold for $67K

July 22, 2016 by Julie Carr Smyth
In this Feb. 20, 2002, file photo, former U.S. Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio, right, shows his son David Glenn, left, and daughter Lyn Glenn the Mercury spacecraft Friendship 7, in which he became the first American in orbit, during a ceremony marking the 40th anniversary of the first U.S. manned orbital flight at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington. Nate D. Sanders Auctions says in-flight instructions used by Glenn as he became the first American to orbit the Earth sold for $66,993 on Thursday, July 21, 2016, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

In-flight instructions used by astronaut John Glenn during his historic 1962 Mercury spaceflight have been sold at auction.

Nate D. Sanders Auctions said the instructions used by Glenn as he became the first American to orbit Earth sold Thursday in Los Angeles for $66,993. There were eight bids, beginning at $25,000. An auction house spokesman said it doesn't disclose the identities of winning bidders.

The instructions included a flight plan for Glenn's Friendship 7 spacecraft detailing the celestial bodies and geographical landmarks to use as guides during his nearly five-hour flight on Feb. 20, 1962. They also told Glenn at what points to take photos, change the film and color filter, put on his helmet and exercise. The document is scrolled around a bobbin that Glenn could maneuver with his thumb.

Glenn, now 95 and living in Columbus with his wife, Annie, had given the instructions to a frogman who helped recover NASA capsules from the ocean, as a thank-you for his work on the Mercury 6 project.

The frogman, Richard "Dick" Dunham, passed them on to a Navy veteran, Justin C. Pollard. They were displayed for three years at the San Diego Air and Space Museum before going up for auction.

In this Feb. 20, 1962, file photo, U.S. astronaut John Glenn climbs inside the capsule of the Mercury spacecraft Friendship 7 before becoming the first American to orbit the Earth, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nate D. Sanders Auctions says in-flight instructions used by former U.S. Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio, as he became the first American to orbit the Earth sold for $66,993 on Thursday, July 21, 2016, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo, File)

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Gigel
5 / 5 (3) Jul 22, 2016
NASA is running out of memorabilia. Time to get some more of them - the genuine kind.
Surveillance_Egg_Unit
5 / 5 (3) Jul 22, 2016
My hero, John Glenn just turned 95 years old a few days ago on July18, 2016. He has an illustrious military career behind him flying combat missions in WW2 and the Korean War, on top of his career as an astronaut. Way to go, John.

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